Controversies concerning mitochondrial replacement therapy

Authors:
Robert Klitzman, M.D., Mark Toynbee, M.B.B.S., Mark V. Sauer, M.D.

Volume 103, Issue 2, Pages 344-346

Abstract:

Research on mitochondrial replacement therapy (MRT) holds the promise of helping women who have, or are at risk of transmitting, mitochondrial disease, but has recently been blocked by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Thus, several critical ethical and policy questions arise. Mitochondrial disease can be devastating for those who have it. Yet existing treatments remain supportive rather than curative. Women confronting this disease have a high chance of having an affected child and limited reproductive alternatives.

Birth weight is associated with inner cell mass grade of blastocysts

Capsule:
Blastocysts with a more developed inner cell mass developed into newborns with a greater weight, when corrected for gestational age and gender.

Authors:
Frederick Licciardi, M.D., Caroline McCaffrey, Ph.D., Cheongeun Oh, Ph.D., Cecilia Schmidt-Sarosi, M.D., David McCulloh, Ph.D.

Volume 103, Issue 2, Pages 382-387

Abstract:

Objective:
To determine the relationship between blastocyst growth parameters and birth weight.

Design:
Cohort study.

Setting:
University-affiliated fertility center.

Patient(s):
In vitro patients who delivered a singleton after a single-blastocyst transfer.

Intervention(s):
None.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
Birth weight adjusted for gestational age at delivery and gender, with adjusted birth weight examined for association with blastocyst scores and grades.

Result(s):
After standard in vitro fertilization (IVF) and thawed embryo transfers, greater birth weight was associated with a higher inner cell mass grade. The grade of the trophectoderm and stage of the blastocyst did not relate to weight.

Conclusion(s):
Embryonic growth as early as day 5 can predict the progress of fetal development as measured by birth weight.

Omics as a window to view embryo viability

Capsule:
Omics technologies offer several noninvasive platforms for the investigation of biomarkers for embryo viability.

Authors:
Rebecca L. Krisher, Ph.D., William B. Schoolcraft, M.D., Mandy G. Katz-Jaffe, Ph.D.

Volume 102, Issue 3, Pages 333-341

Abstract:

The advent of advanced omics technologies and the application of these techniques to the analysis of extremely limited material have opened the door to the investigation of embryo physiology in a focused, in-depth approach never before possible. The application of noninvasive metabolomic and proteomic platforms to understanding embryo viability permits the characterization of individual embryos in culture. Initial clinical data have highlighted the promise of these technologies for the development of noninvasive embryo selection criteria. In this way, a complex view of embryo function can be compiled and related to embryo development, quality, and outcome. Application of knowledge gained from omics will transform both our understanding of embryo physiology as well as our ability to select viable embryos for transfer in assisted reproductive technology.

Articles of Special Interest

Controversies concerning mitochondrial replacement therapy

Friday, January 30, 2015

Authors:
Robert Klitzman, M.D., Mark Toynbee, M.B.B.S., Mark V.…

Birth weight is associated with inner cell mass grade of blastocysts

Friday, January 30, 2015

Capsule:
Blastocysts with a more developed inner cell mass developed into newborns with a greater weight, when corrected for gestational age and gender.…

Omics as a window to view embryo viability

Friday, January 30, 2015
Omics technologies offer several noninvasive platforms for the investigation of biomarkers for embryo viability.

Efficacy and safety of repeated use of ulipristal acetate in uterine fibroids

Friday, January 30, 2015
In a prospective randomized study, repeated 12-week courses of oral ulipristal acetate effectively control bleeding and pain, reduce fibroid volume, and restore quality of life in patients with symptomatic fibroids.
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