Preconception blood pressure and risk of preterm birth A large historical cohort study in a Chinese rural population

Capsule:
We conducted a large-sample, historical study and identified a strong, independent, and linear relationship between preconception BP level and PTB in a Chinese rural reproductive-age population of women.

Authors:
Ying Yang, Ph.D., Yuan He, Ph.D., Qian Li, M.S., Yuanyuan Wang, Ph.D., Zuoqi Peng, M.D., Jihong Xu, Ph.D., Xu Ma, M.S.

Volume 104, Issue 1, Pages 124–130

Abstract:

Objective:
To examine the relationship between preconception blood pressure (BP) and the risk of preterm birth (PTB) using a historical cohort of reproductive-aged women and girls from a Chinese rural population.

Design:
A historical cohort study established between 2010 and 2013 in People’s Republic of China.

Setting:
Local family-planning service agencies and maternal–child care service centers.

Patient(s):
A total of 367,425 reproductive-aged women and girls who participated in the National Free Pre-pregnancy Checkups in 2010–2012 and subsequently had a live birth before October 2013.

Intervention(s):
None.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
Incidence rates of PTB in reproductive-aged women and girls across preconception BP levels.

Result(s):
Preterm births were defined as babies born alive at 28 to 37 weeks of pregnancy. Compared with the participants with a systolic BP of

Conclusion(s):
Our results indicated a strong linear and independent relationship between BP levels and the risk of PTB in Chinese reproductive-aged women and girls. Maternal hypertension before pregnancy can significantly increase the risk of PTB.

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