Blastulation rates decline in a linear fashion from euploid to aneuploid embryos with single versus multiple chromosomal errors

Capsule:
Euploid embryos are far more likely than aneuploid embryos to progress to the blastocyst stage with a linear decrease in probability of blastulation with increasing number of chromosomal abnormalities.

Authors:
Mario Vega, M.D., Andrzej Breborowicz, M.D., Ph.D., Erin Moshier, M.S., Peter McGovern, M.D., Martin Keltz, M.D.,

Volume 102, Issue 2, Pages 394–398

Abstract:

Objective:
To test the hypothesis that the blastulation rate is higher in euploid embryos than in aneuploid embryos as assessed by cleavage-stage biopsy with array-comprehensive genomic hybridization (aCGH).

Design:
Retrospective cohort study.

Setting:
University-affiliated institution.

Patient(s):
Forty-one patients with 48 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles and 385 embryos that underwent cleavage-stage preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with aCGH at the Continuum Reproductive Center between January 2010 and September 2013.

Intervention(s):
None.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
Probability of blastocyst and/or fully expanded or hatching blastocyst (FEHB) progression depending on number of chromosomal abnormalities.

Result(s):
Euploid embryos are twice as likely to progress to blastocyst and three times as likely to progress to FEHB than aneuploid embryos: 76% versus 37% and 56% versus 18%, respectively. For every additional chromosomal abnormality, the likelihood of progressing to the blastocyst stage decreases by 22% and the likelihood of progressing to FEHB decreases by 33%.

Conclusion(s):
Euploid embryos are far more likely than aneuploid embryos to progress to the blastocyst and FEHB stages. There is a linear decrease in probability of blastulation with the increasing number of chromosomal abnormalities.

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