Blastocyst euploidy and implantation rates in a young <35 years and old ≥35 years presumed fertile and infertile patient population

Capsule:
Our data demonstrated no difference in euploid blastocyst rates between presumed fertile and infertile patients. Pregnancy and implantation rates were significantly higher in presumed fertile patients when transferring euploid blastocysts.

Authors:
Tyl Harrison Taylor, M.S., Jennifer L. Patrick, M.S., Susan A. Gitlin, Ph.D., Jack L. Crain, M.D., J.M. Wilson, Ph.D., Darren K. Griffin, Ph.D.

Volume 102, Issue 5, Pages 1318–1323

Abstract:

Objective:
To examine the relationship between blastocyst euploidy and implantation rates in a presumed fertile patient population.

Design:
Retrospective analysis.

Setting:
Private IVF clinic.

Patient(s):
IVF patients undergoing comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS).

Intervention(s):
Embryo biopsy at the blastocyst stage with preimplantation genetic screening using CCS.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
Euploidy, chemical pregnancy, and implantation rates.

Result(s):
There was no significant difference in the number of euploid blastocysts between presumed fertile (68/118, 57.6%) and infertile (75/132, 56.8%) patients <35 years old. Likewise, there was no significant difference in the number of euploid blastocysts between presumed fertile (42/86, 48.8%) and infertile (97/206, 47.1%) patients ≥35 years old. When those same patients underwent a corresponding frozen embryo transfer cycle, presumed fertile patients demonstrated a significantly higher chemical pregnancy rate when compared with infertile patients, 28/33 (84.8%) and 50/81 (61.7%), respectively. Moreover, presumed fertile patients exhibited significantly higher implantation rates compared with infertile patients, 36/42 (85.7%) and 54/109 (66.7%), respectively. Conclusion(s):
When subdivided by maternal age, no significant difference was seen in blastocyst euploidy rates between presumed fertile and infertile patients; however, chemical pregnancy and implantation rates were significantly higher in a presumed fertile patient population even when transferring only euploid blastocysts. This would indicate that infertility, as a disease, may encompass other aspects such as uterine or other unknown embryological factors that can influence outcomes.

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