Acrocentric bivalents positioned preferentially nearby to the XY pair in metaphase I human spermatocytes

Capsule:
Proximity frequencies of autosomic bivalents to the XY pair in metaphase I human spermatocytes were evaluated, showing a nonrandom bivalent distribution and a relative position pattern notably preserved from pachytene to metaphase I.

Authors:
Zaida Sarrate, Ph.D., Joan Blanco, Ph.D., Francesca Vidal, Ph.D.

Volume 98, Issue 5, Pages 1241-1245, November 2012

Abstract:

Objective:
To analyze if the preferential proximity between acrocentric bivalents and the XY pair described at pachytene was maintained in metaphase I human spermatocytes.

Design:
Proximity frequencies of autosomic bivalents to the sex bivalent were evaluated with the analysis of meiotic preparations combining sequentially standard techniques and Multiplex FISH.

Setting:
Assisted Reproduction Centers and Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

Patient(s):
Thirty-seven men consulting for fertility problems.

Intervention(s):
Unilateral testicular biopsies.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
Proximity frequencies analysis to the XY pair, evaluated individually and grouping bivalents was carried out using a logistical regression model with repeated measures.

Result(s):
Bivalents 22 and 15 were observed more frequently near to the sex bivalent than the others. Significant interindividual differences were not observed.

Conclusions:
Results suggest that bivalents distribution to the metaphase plate is nonrandom. The maintenance of the acrocentric chromosomes proximity to the sex bivalent from pachytene to metaphase I would indicate that the relative bivalents position would be notably preserved. The observation of non-interindividual variability, in spite of different infertility etiology, proposes that nuclear organization pattern remains largely unaffected even if spermatogenesis is compromised.

  • Nasser

    Congratulations for this article. It is interesting and I think that there is a perfect link between basic research and the clinical point of view when you revise the translocation cases. As I can see in your tables, BV1 and BV16 are not tipically at the first ring. Did you find any interesting data for this two bivalents? I ask this because I am focusing on this two bivalents in my research. And do you know data about patients with proven fertility that, for example, had a testes biopsy because a previous vasectomy?
    Thank you and congratulations.

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