Racial differences in fibroid prevalence and ultrasound findings in asymptomatic young women 18 to 30 years old A pilot study

Capsule:
Racial differences in fibroid prevalence exist even in young asymptomatic women. Findings of thicker endometrium in black women warrant further investigation, given possible clinical implications.

Authors:
Erica E. Marsh, M.D., M.S.C.I., Geraldine E. Ekpo, M.D., Eden R. Cardozo, M.D., Maureen Brocks, B.A., Tanaka Dune, M.D., Leeber S. Cohen, M.D.

Volume 99, Issue 7, Pages 1951-1957, June 2013

Abstract:

Objective:
1) To determine the prevalence of fibroids in asymptomatic young black and white women (ages 18–30 y); 2) to determine other differences in uterine and adnexal anatomy; and 3) to obtain preliminary data for sample size calculations.

Design:
Pilot cross-sectional study.

Setting:
Academic medical center.

Patient(s):
One hundred one nonparous black and white women, ages 18–30 years, with no known diagnosis of fibroids or clinically suggestive symptoms.

Intervention(s):
A transvaginal ultrasound was performed in the follicular phase in all subjects.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
1) Presence of fibroids; 2) endometrial thickness; 3) ovarian findings.

Result(s):
Of the 101 participants (mean age 24.5 ± 3.5 y), 43% self-identified as black and 57% as white. The prevalence of ultrasound-diagnosed fibroids was 15% overall (26% in black women and 7% in white women). The mean fibroid size was 2.3 ± 2.1 cm. There was a significant difference in endometrial thickness between races, even after adjusting for contraception use and fibroid presence.

Conclusion(s):
Racial differences in fibroid prevalence exist even before women become symptomatic. Findings of thicker endometrium in black women could have clinical implications and warrants further investigation.

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