Association of antimullerian hormone levels with menstrual cycle type and dysmenorrhea in young asymptomatic women

Capsule:
More-severe menstrual pain is associated with lower antimullerian hormone concentration among Japanese women age 20–22 years who had never used oral contraceptives; the effect persisted even after adjustment for menstrual-cycle regularity.

Authors:
Shoko Konishi, Ph.D., Yukiko Nishihama, M.S., Ayaka Iida, B.S., Jun Yoshinaga, Ph.D., Hideki Imai, Ph.D.

Volume 102, Issue 5, Pages 1439–1443

Abstract:

Objective:
To examine the association between antimüllerian hormone (AMH) levels and menstrual-cycle and lifestyle characteristics among young Japanese women.

Design:
Cross-sectional study.

Setting:
A university.

Patient(s):
Female students aged 20–22 years (n = 65) who had never used oral contraceptives.

Intervention(s):
Participants completed a questionnaire on reproductive and lifestyle characteristics, and kept a menstrual-cycle diary for 5 consecutive months. Serum AMH was measured once during the study period.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
Serum AMH concentration.

Result(s):
Compared with women with very mild menstrual pain, serum AMH concentration was 49.6% (95% CI 6.5%–72.8%) lower among women with severe menstrual pain. Higher AMH concentration was associated with irregular menstrual cycles. Even after adjusting for menstrual-cycle regularity and its interaction, more-severe menstrual pain was associated with significantly lower AMH concentration.

Conclusion(s):
Circulating AMH concentration was significantly lower among young Japanese women who had more-severe menstrual pain. Underlying physiological mechanisms need to be addressed in future studies.

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