Optimizing human semen cryopreservation by reducing test vial volume and repetitive test vial sampling

Capsule:
Optimal cryopreservation test vial volume is 100 mL; results from one test vial appear to be sufficiently predictive of post-thaw quality for multiple ejaculates frozen over 10 days.

Authors:
Christian F.S. Jensen, B.Sc., Dana A. Ohl, M.D., Walter R. Parker, M.D., Andre M. Da Rocha, Ph.D., Laura M. Keller, A.A.S., Timothy G. Schuster, M.D., Jens Sønksen, M.D., Ph.D., Gary D. Smith, Ph.D.

Volume 103, Issue 3, Pages 640-646

Abstract:

Objective:
To investigate optimal test vial (TV) volume, utility and reliability of TVs, intermediate temperature exposure (−88°C to −93°C) before cryostorage, cryostorage in nitrogen vapor (VN2) and liquid nitrogen (LN2), and long-term stability of VN2 cryostorage of human semen.

Design:
Prospective clinical laboratory study.

Setting:
University assisted reproductive technology (ART) laboratory.

Patient(s):
A total of 594 patients undergoing semen analysis and cryopreservation.

Intervention(s):
Semen analysis, cryopreservation with different intermediate steps and in different volumes (50–1,000 μL), and long-term storage in LN2 or VN2.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
Optimal TV volume, prediction of cryosurvival (CS) in ART procedure vials (ARTVs) with pre-freeze semen parameters and TV CS, post-thaw motility after two- or three-step semen cryopreservation and cryostorage in VN2 and LN2.

Result(s):
Test vial volume of 50 μL yielded lower CS than other volumes tested. Cryosurvival of 100 μL was similar to that of larger volumes tested. An intermediate temperature exposure (−88°C to −93°C for 20 minutes) during cryopreservation did not affect post-thaw motility. Cryosurvival of TVs and ARTVs from the same ejaculate were similar. Cryosurvival of the first TV in a series of cryopreserved ejaculates was similar to and correlated with that of TVs from different ejaculates within the same patient. Cryosurvival of the first TV was correlated with subsequent ARTVs. Long-term cryostorage in VN2 did not affect CS.

Conclusion(s):
This study provides experimental evidence for use of a single 100 μL TV per patient to predict CS when freezing multiple ejaculates over a short period of time (

  • jimdupree4

    We should all do everything we can to avoid being surprised by low post-thaw sperm viability. This manuscript helps us minimize those situations but focuses just on ejaculated sperm samples. From the authors’ work on this paper, can they comment about using similar techniques for sperm samples obtained from testicular extraction? Do they think that their findings here could be applied in those situations?

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