Treatment of infertility does not increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation

Capsule:
These findings suggest that treatment for infertility does not significantly increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA mutation.

Authors:
Jacek Gronwald, M.D., Karen Glass, M.D., Barry Rosen, M.D., Beth Karlan, M.D., Nadine Tung, M.D., Susan L. Neuhausen, Ph.D., Pal Moller, M.D., Peter Ainsworth, Ph.D., Ping Sun, Ph.D., Steven A. Narod, M.D., Jan Lubinski, M.D., Joanne Kotsopoulos, Ph.D. the Hereditary Breast Cancer Clinical Study Group

Volume 105, Issue 3, Pages 781-785

Abstract:

Objective:
To evaluate the relationship between use of fertility medication (i.e., selective estrogen receptor [ER] modulator, gonadotropin, or other) or infertility treatment (i.e., IVF or IUI) and the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

Design:
A matched case-control study of 941 pairs of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers with and without a diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

Setting:
Genetic clinics.

Patient(s):
Detailed information regarding treatment of infertility was collected from a routinely administered questionnaire.

Intervention(s):
None.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals associated with fertility treatment.

Result(s):
There was no significant relationship between the use of any fertility medication or IVF treatment (odds ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.18–2.33) and the subsequent risk of ovarian cancer.

Conclusion(s):
Our findings suggest that treatment for infertility does not significantly increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA mutation.

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