Role of vitamin D in uterine fibroid biology

Capsule:
Vitamin D3 or its hypocalcemic analog, paricalcitol, may be a novel therapeutic approach as an effective, safe, nonsurgical treatment option for uterine fibroids.

Authors:
Soumia Brakta, M.D., Justin S. Diamond, B.S., Ayman Al-Hendy, M.D., Ph.D., Michael P. Diamond, M.D., Sunil K. Halder, Ph.D.

Volume 104, Issue 3, Pages 698-706

Abstract:

Objective:
To provide a detailed summary of current scientific knowledge on uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) in vitro and in in vivo animal models, as well as to postulate the potential role of vitamin D3 as an effective, inexpensive, safe, long-term treatment option for uterine fibroids.

Design:
PubMed search articles were used to identify the most relevant studies on uterine fibroids, as well as effects of vitamin D3 on uterine fibroid cells and fibroid tumor growth in in vivo animal models.

Setting:
University research laboratory.

Patient(s):
Not applicable.

Intervention(s):
None.

Main Outcome Measure(s):
Not applicable.

Result(s):
Despite numerous publications available on uterine fibroids, information about the role that vitamin D3 plays in the regulation of uterine fibroids is limited. Most of the recent vitamin D3–related studies on uterine fibroids were published from our group. Recent studies have demonstrated that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the development of uterine fibroids. Our recent studies have demonstrated that vitamin D3 reduces leiomyoma cell proliferation in vitro and leiomyoma tumor growth in in vivo animal models. These results postulate the potential role of vitamin D3 for an effective, safe, nonsurgical medical treatment option for uterine fibroids.

Conclusion(s):
This article reviews human and animal studies and uncovers new possibilities for understanding the vitamin D–based therapeutic option for an effective, safe, long-term treatment of uterine fibroids. On the basis of these results, a clinical trial with vitamin D3 or a hypocalcemic analog, paricalcitol, may be warranted for nonsurgical medical treatment of uterine fibroids.

  • Vicky

    Too bad there isn’t anything to dissolve uterine fibroid tumors the size of an orange and without procedures like Uterine Artery Embolization, which can have side effects or are dangerous. My current doctor now to be ex-doctor, can’t wait to surgically remove my uterus and ovaries. She’s suggested it several times and under the same breath, quickly added that I will also need an abdominal reconstruction. I’m assuming she would be using the trans-vaginal mesh procedure which I would never ever agree to. I’m doing fine for now. I am considering possible surgery only to avoid any problems I may later have when I’m older. I fear many of these newer doctors who seem to want to rush me to the operating room. Greed has taken the front seat in everything today. How sad and also disturbing because you can’t know who to really trust anymore.

Translate »