Subclinical hypothyroidism in young women with polycystic ovary syndrome An analysis of clinical hormonal and metabolic parameters

Capsule:
Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome and subclinical hypothyroidism present higher serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with no changes in other lipid profile parameters, insulin resistance, or phenotypic manifestations.

Authors:
Cristina Laguna Benetti-Pinto, M.D., Ph.D., Vanessa Ribeiro Santana Berini Piccolo, M.D., Heraldo Mendes Garmes, M.D., Ph.D., Cássia Raquel Teatin Juliato, M.D., Ph.D.

Volume 99, Issue 2, Pages 588-592, February 2013

Abstract:

Objective:
To analyze of the relationship between selected clinical and metabolic parameters in young women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and normal thyroid function or subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH).

Design:
A cross-sectional cohort study.

Setting:
Tertiary care setting.

Patients:
Women diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria (n=168).

Interventions:
Clinical, hormonal and metabolic parameters were evaluated. SCH was defined as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels of 4.5-10 mIU/L.

Main outcome measure:
Separately, PCOS and SCH exert adverse effects on metabolic parameters; however, in conjunction their effect is unclear. This study evaluated whether SCH in women with PCOS affects clinical, hormonal and metabolic parameters.

Results:
The mean age of the 168 women was 24±5.8 years. Mean body mass index was 33.4±8.2. Thyroid function was normal in 149 women, while 19 had SCH. Only serum LDL-c and PRL levels were significantly higher in the women with SCH (122.6±25.6 and 17.7±7.7) compared to those with normal thyroid function (105.6±33 and 14±10.3).

Conclusion:
In young women with PCOS, SCH is associated with higher LDL-c levels, albeit with no changes in other lipid profile parameters, insulin resistance or phenotypic manifestations. This study adds to current evidence supporting an association between PCOS and SCH.

Translate »